Weekly Update from Twitter

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Weekly Update from Twitter

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WordPress 2.7 released

Finally WordPress 2.7 has been released. It has a slick new interface design, which I do like very much.

The main navigation on the left fits better on modern 16:9 or 16:10 screens… not like the ribbons in MS Office for example which is very counterproductive on those screens.

This is the second big redesign in 2008, which is not the best thing imho but as far as I know it had to be done. There also have been a lot of enhancements under the hood. They will ease the integration of new backend plugins and themes. I wonder what will hit the surface in 2009….

Thanks to the great marketing community behind wordpress there’s also a short video introducing the new user interface available.

Weekly Update from Twitter

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Three Reasons Open Source Will Save The Economy

Nice article by whurley

[…]
You buy the shovel, but you want the hole.

It’s amazing how easy it is to forget that software is just a tool. Companies purchase software so their employees can execute specific tasks. You don’t need a laser-guided shovel with built-in GPS navigation to dig your hole. A plain ol’ shovel will get the job done just fine.

So buck up, little campers, open source software even comes with a free pack of weenies and a bag of marshmallows. Seriously, folks, go take the money you save by going open source and invest it in keeping the people around who really run your business. They need those jobs now more than ever.
[…]

more @ http://whurley.com/2008/12/03/three-reasons-open-source-will-save-the-economy/

Support the Free Software Movement

http://www.change.org/ideas/view/support_the_free_software_movement

http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/fsfs/rms-essays.pdf

Every generation has its philosopher — a writer or an artist who captures the imagination of a time. Sometimes these philosophers are recognized as such; often it takes generations before the connection is made real. But recognized or not, a time gets marked by the people who speak its ideals, whether in the whisper of a poem, or the blast of a political movement. Our generation has a philosopher. He is not an artist, or a professional writer. He is a programmer. Richard Stallman began his work in the labs of MIT, as a programmer and architect building operating system software. He has built his career on a stage of public life, as a programmer and an architect founding a movement for freedom in a world increasingly defined by “code.” “Code” is the technology that makes computers run. Whether inscribed in software or burned in hardware, it is the collection of instructions, first written in words, that directs the functionality of machines. These machines — computers — increasingly define and control our life. They determine how phones connect, and what runs on TV. They decide whether video can be streamed across a broadband link to a computer. They control what a computer reports back to its manufacturer. These machines run us. Code runs these machines. What control should we have over this code? What understanding? What freedom should there be to match the control it enables? What power? These questions have been the challenge of Stallman’s life. Through his works and his words, he has pushed us to see the importance of keeping code “free.” Not free in the sense that code writers don’t get paid, but free in the sense that the control coders build be transparent to all, and that anyone have the right to take that control, and modify it as he or she sees fit. This is “free software”; “free software” is one answer to a world built in code…